Katie RinderleKatie Rinderle


Katie Rinderle Wiki – Katie Rinderle Biography

 

Katie Rinderle.  nearly six months ago, on the day before Valentine’s Day, Due West Elementary School in Marietta, Georgia, held its annual Scholastic Book Fair. Hundreds of picture books, early reader books, and more were available for purchase by students, parents, and Due West educators.Due West’s gifted specialist Katie Rinderle spent $30.96 on four picture books, including Doña Esmeralda Who Ate Everything by Melissa De La Cruz, about a stylish old lady who on diet soda and the lives uneaten food on children’s plates, and My Shadow is Purple by Australian author Scott Stuart.My Shadow is Purple sat on her shelf for a month, until Rinderle’s fifth graders chose it for their morning read-aloud. The next day, following a parent complaint, Rinderle was called into the principal’s office. The book was “divisive,” she was told. The following week, she was sent home for good—and, on June 6, she was issued a formal letter of termination, which she is appealing with help from her union, the Georgia Association of Educators (GAE), and the Goodmark Law Firm .



Today, Rinderle is believed to be the first teacher in Georgia to have been fired because of a trio of vaguely worded 2022 state laws that ban teachers from teaching “divisive concepts.”Educators fear she won’t be the last, which is likely the point of the Georgia legislation and similar classroom censorship laws in other states. “Teachers are fearful of [crossing] the invisible line in their classrooms… because they don’t know where it is,” says Rinderle. So, they self-censor, pulling books from their shelves and shutting down student discussions. Or they just quit.The consequence is a grim and limited education for students, who are experiencing less access to dedicated teachers, diverse books, and honest and accurate history lessons.

But NEA members—through their unions—also are fighting back. Georgia isn’t the only state censoring, even firing, teachers. Since 2021,according to the Movement Advancement Project.Most of the bills center on a list of “divisive concepts” rooted in a 2020 executive order from former President Donald Trump. That order, which was revoked by President Biden, banned federal agencies from certain types of diversity trainings, including those that talked about people’s unconscious biases or the nation’s long history of racism and racist violence.Tulsa Riots
WE WILL NOT ERASE HISTORY
We Will not Erase History



Censoring classroom discussion on race and gender or banning books and taking them off shelves isn’t enough for some politicians—now they are zeroing in on state standards to sow chaos and undermine public education.
Learn MoreIn Florida, the “Don’t Say Gay” and laws mean teachers have and been forced to remove books including The Bluest Eye by Pulitzer Prize-winner Toni Morrison, as well as biographies of baseball playerNearly six months ago, on the day before Valentine’s Day, Due West Elementary School in Marietta, Georgia, held its annual Scholastic Book Fair. Hundreds of picture books, early reader books, and more were available for purchase by students, parents, and Due West educators.

Due West’s gifted specialist Katie Rinderle spent $30.96 on four picture books, including Doña Esmeralda Who Ate Everything by Melissa De La Cruz, about a stylish old lady who on diet soda and the lives uneaten food on children’s plates, and My Shadow is Purple by Australian author Scott Stuart.My Shadow is Purple sat on her shelf for a month, until Rinderle’s fifth graders chose it for their morning read-aloud. The next day, following a parent complaint, Rinderle was called into the principal’s office. The book was “divisive,” she was told. The following week, she was sent home for good—and, on June 6, she was issued a formal letter of termination, which she is appealing with help from her union, the Georgia Association of Educators (GAE), and the Goodmark Law Firm .Today, Rinderle is believed to be the first teacher in Georgia to have been fired because of a trio of vaguely worded 2022 state laws that ban teachers from teaching “divisive concepts.”



Educators fear she won’t be the last, which is likely the point of the Georgia legislation and similar classroom censorship laws in other states. “Teachers are fearful of [crossing] the invisible line in their classrooms… because they don’t know where it is,” says Rinderle. So, they self-censor, pulling books from their shelves and shutting down student discussions. Or they just quit.The consequence is a grim and limited education for students, who are experiencing less access to dedicated teachers, diverse books, and honest and accurate history lessons.

But NEA members—through their unions—also are fighting back. Georgia isn’t the only state censoring, even firing, teachers. Since 2021,according to the Movement Advancement Project.Most of the bills center on a list of “divisive concepts” rooted in a 2020 executive order from former President Donald Trump. That order, which was revoked by President Biden, banned federal agencies from certain types of diversity trainings, including those that talked about people’s unconscious biases or the nation’s long history of racism and racist violence

.Tulsa Riots
WE WILL NOT ERASE HISTORY
We Will not Erase HistoryCensoring classroom discussion on race and gender or banning books and taking them off shelves isn’t enough for some politicians—now they are zeroing in on state standards to sow chaos and undermine public education.
Learn MoreIn Florida, the “Don’t Say Gay” and laws mean teachers have and been forced to remove books including The Bluest Eye by Pulitzer Prize-winner Toni Morrison, as well as biographies of baseball player.

Age

Katie Rinderle age is 40 years old:

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As a result, many Florida teachers are resigning.—support us, trust us, protect us, or lose us,” warned Hernando County teacher Daniel Scott. Weeks earlier, Scott ‘s colleague—who also quit—told school board members: Another resigned after a State Department of Education investigation was launched into her And, of course, there ‘s the oneIn January 2023, according to the Florida Education Association. In 2019, that same number was 2,219. It’s the worst teacher shortage in Florida’s history, affecting students daily. Indeed, the Hernando math teacher who resigned pointed out that her math students outscored the county average by 15 percent, “and now a sub will take my spot in my cold, bare classroom.” And it ‘s not just Florida either. Last month, in Wisconsin, teacher Melissa Tempel was fired after she ban her district’s decision to her first graders from singing the song “Rainbowland” by Dolly Parton and Miley Cyrus.

And, in South Carolina, high school teacher Mary Wood has run afoul of the school board for planning to use Te-Nehisi Coates ‘book Between the World and Me in her Advanced Placement class. Wood’s lesson was banned whenRinderle read My Shadow is Purple before buying it. She liked it. “I just thought it had a wonderful message: Be true to yourself, embrace others,” she says. Essentially, the award-winning book is about “finding value in [yourself],” which leads to students developing greater self-confidence and well-being, she says. For gifted students especially, who often feel different and excluded from their peers, it’s heartening to hear a story about valuing and embracing the differences in people, says Rinderle.On the first page, the Shadow’s rhyming narrator explains how “my dad has a shadow is blue as a berry” while Mum’s is “as pink as a blossoming cherry,” but “mine is quite different. It’s both and it’s none.”And, on a subsequent page:

“Why can’t I love sport and dancing and trains? And ponies and glitter and engines and trains? Why must I choose and exclude all the rest? I love choosing both because both is the best.”Rinderle reads books aloud to her students—from kindergarten through fifth grade—because it’s a proven strategy to help build community in the classroom. First, she reads. Second, she guides them in group discussion. And then, she assigns them a thinking task to complete in their sketchbooks. On this particular day, Rinderle asked them to write their own “shadow poems.” Their work was just wonderful—and it is driving Kennesaw State University Professor Roberta Gardner a little crazy that none of Rinderle ‘s critics can see that. “The writing that the kids did was just phenomenal,” says Gardner, an expert in literacy education and who teaches aspiring and certified teachers.

An article from the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) quotes some of the poems. Wrote one student: “This is reader-response theory in action!” said Gardner. Developed by the late Louise Rosenblatt, the theory posits that every reader takes unique meaning from a text. “Whenever we read anything, there is the reader, there is the text, and there is what Rosenblatt called ‘the poem’ that comes out of that intersection,” explains Gardner. “Authors will tell you that once it’s out of their hands, it becomes whatever it is for the reader!”It frustrates Gardner that lawmakers are writing these classroom censorship laws—and school boards are enforcing them—without understanding how students learn.

“I just wish it was a broader conversation about reading and also certainly about inclusivity,” she says. “What families and what children were considered when [these laws] were written?” National polls show most Americans agree with NEA members that students should be able to read books with characters that look like them. Regardless of political party, parents also say students should learn the truth about American history, including about chattel slavery and the U.S. Civil Rights Movement.Together, many of these parents are working with NEA members to get diverse books back into the hands of teachers and enable students to learn about what NEA President Becky Pringle calls Just this week,challenging the constitutionality of the state’s “prohibited concepts ” law, which said TEA President Tanya T.

Coats.Lawsuits also have been filed in Florida,In Florida, in November, a federal judge partially blocked the “Stop W.O.K.E. Act,” preventing it from taking effect in the state’s public universities. wrote U.S. District Judge Mark Walker, in his ruling.Meanwhile, in Georgia, union members and community supporters are standing with Rinderle. In late July, and GAE sponsored read-alouds of My Shadow is Purple in coffee shops, bookstores, churches, and hair salons. On July 29, the Teach for Freedom Collective gathered people in an Atlanta park to read aloud their favorite culturally affirming books.High school social studies teacher Sally Stanhope helped organize the event. As a civics teacher, she risks vi

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Most are expected to appear in court at a later date for a process to determine their status.